We know local.

„Events, Food, Music, Culture, Nightlife“

History Lesson


06. February 2014

History Lesson

The Baltic provinces became part of the Russian

Empire in the 1790s after Russia defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Starting in the 1820s, serfdom was systematically abolished throughout the empire, replaced instead by a system of rental contracts and more forced unpaid labour, resulting in greater instability and hardship among the peasantry. Due to rising literacy (it was almost 100%)and the emergence of a national- minded educated elite, 1860 marked the start of the Estonian “national awakening”. The national awakening included the start of the Estonian Alexander School, the Society of Estonian Literati and all-Estonian song festivals, a tradition continued to this day.

World War I and the 1917 Russian Revolution provided a new window of political opportunity: Estonia declared independence on February 24th, 1918, only to be invaded by the German Army the next day. The subsequent War of Independence lasted two years, ending in 1920 with the signing of a peace treaty with Soviet Russia. The Estonian republic lasted until 1939. Estonia’s independence from 1920 to 1939 saw the flourishing of modern Estonian culture; for the first time, education in Estonian would be offered to all citizens. Estonia’s independence was short- lived, however; the German-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact between Stalin and Hitler was to divide Eastern Europe in 1939. The Soviets invaded Estonia on June 16th, 1940 and on June 17th, 1940, the Estonian government fell to avoid further casualties. Estonia regained its independence on August 21, 1991 when the Soviet Union fell.

The 24th of February marks Estonian Independence Day, marking 96 years since the Estonian Declaration of Independence. The occasion is marked annually with the presidential reception and a concert, held in different cities each year. The president gives a speech, which is broadcast live on television, and viewers also enjoy the ironically named “Penguin Parade,” of the who’s who of Estonia arriving at the reception.

Happy Independence Day!

Kristina Lupp

Editor-in-chief

The sights and  smells of the holidays

The sights and smells of the holidays

If there’s one consolation to the long dark nights and short gloomy days of autumn, it’s that you know Christmas […]

01. November 2016

An Estonian Christmas

An Estonian Christmas

Estonian Christmas is a mixture of traditional and modern, a combination of cultures and cuisines. The many occupations of Estonia […]

01. November 2016

Festival Season

Festival Season

There is always something going on in Estonia and autumn is no exception. The leaves are changing, the days getting […]

03. October 2016

A Harvest of Events

A Harvest of Events

Autumn is a fun time in Tallinn. The city, and even the country is bustling with different events and fairs […]

01. September 2016

Summer Blues

Summer Blues

Growing up, there were always certain events that marked the end of summer. While we looked forward to them, we […]

01. August 2016

Event-Filled Days of Summer

Event-Filled Days of Summer

If it seems like there are dozens of events happening every week and weekend during summer, it’s because it’s true. […]

01. July 2016

Secrets of Midsummer

Secrets of Midsummer

If you happen to be in Tallinn for Midsummer, you’ll probably be wondering why it’s so quiet. Midsummer or St […]

06. June 2016

Spring Fever

Spring Fever

Ah, the smell of spring in the air! Longer days, more sunshine, and the anticipation of summer being just around […]

05. April 2016